Pennsylvania One Book Early Literacy Program

PA-One-Book-2022-CoverThe PA One Book selection for 2022 is Saturday. Written and illustrated by Oge Mora, the book was published in 2019 by Little Brown & Company Books for Young Readers.

Overview

In this heartfelt and universal story, a mother and daughter look forward to their special Saturday routine together every single week. But this Saturday, one thing after another goes wrong–ruining storytime, salon time, picnic time, and the puppet show they’d been looking forward to going to all week. Mom is nearing a meltdown…until her loving daughter reminds her that being together is the most important thing of all.

More information coming soon!


Early Literacy is Important!

Pennsylvania One Book is an established program that highlights the importance of early literacy development in preschoolers and the significance of reading early and often to children.

Facts about the importance of language and reading

  1.  Ninety percent of a child’s brain growth occurs during birth and 4 years of age, so it is suggested that parents begin reading to their child at birth.
  2. When we read picture books to children, researchers have found that 95 percent of their attention is on the pictures. By occasionally pointing to the words in the book, you are helping them realize that it is the text we are reading, not the pictures.
  3. Research has shown that children who play with sounds of words in the preschool years are better prepared to read when they get to school.
  4. The language used in story books is different from what we use when we are speaking. Stories also have a certain structure with a beginning, middle and an end.
  5. Reading aloud introduces the patterns of language and develops vocabulary.
  6. Reading to a child just 20 minutes each day will enable him or her to hear 1 million words in a year and will expand his or her vocabulary by 1,000 words.
  7. Acting out stories or parts of them, having young children use their whole bodies, helps them internalize and understand what is happening in the story.
  8. Reading aloud helps a child develop a longer attention span and encourages the art of listening.
  9. Sharing stories introduces and keeps alive the cultural heritage of our own traditional tales and those of other cultures.
  10. Rhyming is one way that children learn to hear that words are made up of smaller parts.
  11. Writing can be very motivating. It helps children make the connection between the spoken and the written word. Writing begins with scribbles and develops into the ability to write letters.
  12. By using specific names for things, like cat and kitten, not only helps children learn new words, it also helps them understand differences between similar things.